how i C it

Pull up a chair and stay a while.

Archive for the tag “#building bridges”

Brands, What Do You Have to Say for Yourself?

Photo courtesy of cleanreputations.com

Chapter 15 of Brian Solis’ book, “Engage!” was pretty interesting. The main focus of the chapter is about distinguishing yourself and the brand you represent, yet being able to bring them together. One of the first things Solis talks about is how your reputation precedes you. At one point he says, “go Google yourself” and view what you see through a stranger’s eyes. What will the results say about you? I think this is a perfect way to see what the social objects you share online say about you. He then went on to say that, “Your actions and words online are indeed extensions to how people perceived and react to the brand you represent.” This is where a lot of brands get into trouble. When your name is associated with a certain brand, your mistakes become the brand’s mistakes, which can really put a brand indirectly in hot water. This is why some brands ask employees to reframe from posting things about their political affiliation, religion, etc. While you may not intentionally say something hurtful to the brand, people will see it that way. I also enjoyed Solis’ concept about social economy and how the relationships we create online serve as the ‘currency’ individuals can invest in their personal portfolios. It’s really an easy and cool way to look at it.

Photo courtesy of demandforce.com

Another great point Solis brought up was crafting a “constant profile that conveys what it is you stand for and the value you bring to the table.” I think this is something brands should definitely pay attention to, especially when there are multiple representatives online. It all relates back to Chapter 12 and the Brand Reflection Cycle. The last point I want to bring up is how you create the foundation of your online reputation by “listening and observing where, how, and why the conversations are taking place.” From there the brand can determine “the tone and nature of the dialogue” and see where they fit in the conversation.

A great line to sum up the chapter is,

With social media comes great responsibility…

Chapter 16 focused on how with enough learning and experimenting, a brand can use social media more effectively. Solis talks about how building a presence online requires “social architecture, engineering, and empathy.” He once again stressed the importance of using these tools to build bridges between the brand and its publics by using channels such as Facebook and LinkedIn for “listening, learning, and participating.”

A statement that really stood out to me was when Solis said, “As social media becomes accepted and practiced industry-wide, change will also stem from outside pressure.” I think we’ve already begun to see this within the last few months with the rejection of SOPA and Susan G. Komen’s reverse decision regarding Planned Parenthood.

One of the last points I want to bring up is one that I think is essential for brands to learn. Solis says, “It’s a matter of “being human” versus “humanizing the story.” He says not to necessary carry your brand as just anyone, but to humanize your brand enough that people can relate and sympathize with it. The brand has to know how to balance distinguishing themselves as a brand while not alienating themselves from their public.

Brands have to remember,

You are the voice, spirit, and mind of the brand and the people and culture that define it.

Both of these chapters had great information for brands and their reputations.

Advertisements

The Dealio on SMO

Unlike last week, these chapters took me a little while longer to get. In Chapter 10, Solis introduced the topic of social objects and how they have become the connection between us and others. I guess you could say that social objects in any given network are the conversation starters. As a company, it’s important that this is recognized because without interest, there aren’t any opportunities to engage. Therefore, without engagement there are no relationships formed and no new customers gained.

Solis then went on to talk about social media optimization (SMO). This whole section was new to me. I had heard of the SMO, but never really understood it or its purpose. Now I know it basically means using the tools you have to get the most of social media searches. One of the first points Solis brings up is that you aren’t guaranteed a million hits once you upload your content. As he mentioned in an earlier chapter, content is not viral, it’s the people who make it viral. Companies have to find a reason why people would want to share the content they put online or as Gina would say, “So what? Who cares?” Solis specifically describes the concept as this: “We have to integrate digital seduction in the objects we wish to earn attention and notoriety.”  A company wants to give their consumers a reason to ‘favorite’ something so that it shows up in their feed and in turn catches the attention of the consumer’s friends.

Photo Courtesy of hubspot.com

In order to really get the most of social media, companies need to utilize the titles, tags and descriptions of their social objects. I was not aware that these three things that we sometimes pay no attention to, can make such a huge difference. The examples given by Solis of how to really use the three areas, helped me understand how paying attention to key search words and the terminology of your audience can essentially give your content legs.

Chapter 11 talks about the other aspects of SMO. This is where it got a little more confusing for me. I was able to distinguish the difference between synchronizing and aggregating, but it was the application part that lost me a little. My first thought for synchronizing was a company using HootSuite but I wasn’t really sure. Solis does mention that the process of synchronizing and aggregating can be complicated and I agree.

Something I was able to follow along with is the section about defining the journey for the consumer. A company has to know the best destination for their consumer to go so that the interaction and discussion can continue. The company needs to create bridges between their consumers and their social objects. Solis says an important part of that is leading the followers to resolution.

The last thing I found really interesting but not surprising was the fact that 54 percent of companies link back to Twitter instead of Facebook. I can understand this because while Facebook has more users, Twitter is able to reach more people in a shorter time. Smart.

Overall, I thought these two chapters were great content wise. I just think it’s going to take me a bit before I can fully grasp it.

I’m Ready to “Engage”

Let me begin this post by stating the obvious. Social media is no joke and Brian Solis, author of “Engage,” does a great job explaining why. Within the first couple of chapters I realized just how much I have to learn about this tool and Solis says as much in Chapter 3. It’s a continuous learning process and you have to be ready to go with it because if you don’t, you get left behind. In relation to jumping on board the ‘new media’ train, Solis mentions just joining a network is ‘child’s play.’ You have to know how to use it for your advantage or you’re just setting yourself up for disappointment. You MUST put in the work!

A major point Solis made is that once you begin participating and interacting with your audience, your organization becomes more humanized. Solis said, “People don’t participate in conversations with brands: they converse with the people who are the ambassadors of the brands.” More companies are getting rid of the automated recordings and actually having representatives communicate one-on-one with the consumers. This is where you begin to form the relationships or the build the bridges between the organization and its publics, which is something Solis brings up a lot. The public feels like they’re being heard and the fact that you’re taking time out to respond or converse with them shows that you care. Continued participation can lead to trust, loyalty and long-term relationships, which should be one of the company’s main goals.

At one point Solis stated that social media is “an opportunity and a privilege.” I never really thought of it that way, but it makes sense. It relates back to the ‘child’s play’ concept that anyone can join without having a purpose. Social media is such a powerful tool and can really open up several new opportunities for companies to expand their reach or improve their product. It’s definitely not something companies should abuse.

Chapter 3 was a great chapter and I was able to take a lot from it. It’s definitely got me excited to read the rest of the book!

Post Navigation