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Bloggin’ the Blog

After reading Chapter 4 of Brian Solis‘s book “Engage!”, I’ve noticed he uses the word ‘bridge’ a lot when discussing social media. He stresses the importance of having bridges to allow the two-way interaction between the company and its publics. The time the company contributes to building those bridges is going to determine if social media becomes an opportunity for failure or success. He also points out that since it’s a two-way information flow, the company’s choice to ignore it or embrace it will not stop the conversation, it’s going to continue either way. Solis said, “We contribute to our perception through absence and participation. We contribute to our presence.” In other words, the amount of time and effort you put into developing your social media presence is going to reflect in your company’s image. The best method is to be immersed in the conversation so that if negative things do come up, you’re there to put out the small fires.

Another theme that comes up is the notion of ‘earning’ success in social media. Just because you create an account doesn’t guarantee your brand success. Solis stated, “…reach is not prescribed; it must be earned.” Yes, you may have the initial followers, but if you don’t keep them engaged you will lose them just as quick. Once again, the time and effort you put into communicating with your publics will determine how many people you reach.

In this chapter, Solis highlights the several different forums. The first was blogs. I’m not an avid blogger, but I do read a lot of them to catch up on the latest entertainment news. To be honest, I don’t really associate blogs with companies because sometimes they’re just miniature billboards. Solis brought up a great point when he said, “The best corporate blogs are genuine and designed to help people.” Readers don’t want to read pages of ads; we see enough of them on TV every day. I think a good method some companies use when blogging is having experts as guest bloggers. It keeps the blog fresh and it attracts different audiences.

Podcasts are amazing! I‘ve subscribed to a few channels for my favorite shows. It’s basically commentary from the producers and writers of the show. Every episode, they record a podcast to explain why they shot a scene a certain way or how the idea for a certain line came about. I really enjoy it as a listener and viewer because it lets me into their world.  It makes me appreciate the product (TV show) more because now I know what goes into creating it. I think podcasts are another great way to make the consumer feel like they’re getting exclusive information. It keeps them engaged.

Lastly, IBM’s Second Life virtual community sounds really cool! The fact that they effectively used the tools available to them and saved so much money (between $320,000 -$350,000 according to reports) is awesome. They recognized a way to connect all of their employees and executives from around the world, which was groundbreaking at the time.

Follow this link to a short video about the virtual community. Very interesting.

Another great chapter!

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2 thoughts on “Bloggin’ the Blog

  1. Hey There,
    Another great post. I enjoy reading your thoughts on the chapter and comparing them to what I gather from the chapter. So different but threaded with the same theme. I agree with Solis when he talks about the conversation between the blogger and the audience. You could either be active or inactive, either way the conversation will go on. That is great! A good brand communicates through the positive and the negative and works toward improvement virtually lasting longer! If I should start a blog outside of this class, I will definitely try to embody everything Solis has talked about. Enjoyed reading this.

    -Orlando

  2. The relationship a blogger builds with their community depends on how much the blogger puts into the relationship.

    If a blogger writes week after week, yet never interacts with his/her community, they will stop coming.

    The “Bridge” that Solis speaks about is critical. This “bridge” embodies two-way communication.

    Gina

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